Find out about Jandeys

The Jandeys Story

Company Profile

 


Hi there! If you've made it to this page via our homepage, you've probably worked out that we make jandals. Our aim is pretty simple, we're all about keeping your feet cool by producing jandals that you, your mates and even your mate's old man are happy to slip onto your feet.


 

Jandeys is a global jandal brand from New Zealand. We design and manufacture flip flops, or jandals as we call them in New Zealand. We're known for producing top-quality jandals made from soft natural rubber soles and comfortable PVC straps. We use our own original molds making Jandeys unique and original. We work with retailers, distributors and also produce custom designed jandals for other organisations. Feel free to get in contact for more details.

 

How Jandeys Got Started

 
In our native New Zealand, jandals are so popular they are regarded as a national icon. Like many people, we love wearing jandals. We wear them to work, to the beach, to restaurants - we pretty much live in them. Back in the 1950s, a fellow Kiwi made the world’s first rubber jandals. Nowadays, they are worn by millions of people worldwide.

 

Back in 2011, we knew that New Zealand did not have its own jandal brand of any real quality or style. We wanted to change that to be able to share this iconic Kiwi product with people around the world. 

 

Jandeys was established in 2012. Our ongoing objective is to create natural rubber jandals that people love wearing as much as we do. Awesome looking, comfortable Jandeys jandals that Kiwis love.

 


 

Our Logo

 

Our logo was designed to represent a jandal strap. However, instead of the top point being centered, it has been created using the same proportions made famous by Leonardo da Vinci’s painting, the Vitruvian Man - a painting based on perfect human proportions. The painting is sometimes called the Proportions of Man. Jandeys takes inspiration from this as our distinct range of jandals are carefully molded and shaped to suit the proportions of your feet. Added to this, our high-quality natural rubber quickly molds to the shape of your feet for additional comfort. 

 

History of the Jandal

 

There is certainly some debate about the person first accredited for bringing rubber jandals into the world. Many say it was New Zealander, Morris Yock in the early 1950s, while others argue it was an Englishman (living in Hong Kong and later in New Zealand), John Cowie in the late 1940s. For now, the dispute may have been put on ice and left for their family members to deliberate on, but one thing's for sure, the jandal, an amalgam of 'Japanese sandal' is still so popular in New Zealand with over 80% of Kiwis admitting they own a pair and more than 60% revealing they own 2 or more pairs.

 

An interesting fact about jandals in New Zealand is that more left-footed ones seem to wash up on Kiwi beaches than right-footed ones – 23 years of evidence from a study of Northland beaches found that 70% of washed-up jandals were left-footed. The reason for this is debatable but one theory is that it's because of the way (predominantly right-footed) New Zealand boaties launch their boats, leaving their left foot in the water while they push off from a beach or boat ramp.

 

Jandals are known around the world by many different names:

 

Thongs in Australia.
Plakkies and slip-slops (or just slops) in South Africa.
Go-aheads in the South Pacific.
Flip flops in the UK and Canada.
Chappal in India and Pakistan. 
Jia jiao tuo (夾腳拖) in Taiwan.
Flip flops in the USA or clam diggers in Texas.

Slippers in Singapore and Malaysia.
Chinelos in Brazil. 
Tsinelas in the Philippines.
Tongs in France.
Sayonares (σαγιονάρες) in Greece. 
Japonki in Poland.

Chancletas in Spain. 
Shlyopantsi (шлёпанцы) in Russia and Ukraine.
Ojotas in Argentina.

Klip klappere in Denmark.

Sandals, setta or zōri in Japan.

Žabky (little frogs) or vietnamky in the Czech Republic.

Papuci in Romania.

Peullib peullab (플립플랍) in Korea.

Dép tông in Vietnam.

Schlapfen in Austria.

Slippers in Hawaii.

Djapanki in Bulgaria.

Infradito in Italy.

 

Oh yeah: We use Facebook quite a bit, so become a fan and keep in touch with us!